Before and After

A client came to me with a pair of larimar earrings she had in her personal jewelry stash. She hadn’t worn them in a while because she didn’t like the fact that they were so plain and she wasn’t fond of french hook earring wires either.

I was told to re-vamp the design and give them a makeover. I took them apart because honestly, whoever made these, didn’t do a great job. I made completely new bezels adorned with twisted wire, embellished them with some antiquing and gave them ball posts. They turned out so cute I think I will make more of these to add to my inventory.

Let me know what you think in the comments!

Love always,

Adribefore after larimar

before and after larimar earrings

before and after larimar earrings

 

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Making a Silver Replica from a Bone Pendant

Custom requests are when I have the most fun. In this particular case, it was extra fun because I was making my husband’s anniversary gift!

He already owned a Hei Matau pendant made out of bone and wanted it in silver. Since  bone is very fragile, I couldn’t make a mold “the regular way”. Normally I would use silicone rubber and make a mold using a vulcanizer. However, in this case, the vulcanizer’s heat would have pulverized the bone and ruined the mold. For this reason I had to use a special two-part resin mold that cures at room temperature.

Here is how I did it:

1. I applied Super Glue to the bottom of the bone pendant (hei matau) and attached it on a brass sprue.

bone hook on frame

2. Took two aluminum plates and covered the frame. Placed two small clasps on each side to hold the frames tightly.

frames

3. Mixed the resin and the catalyst according to the manufacturer’s instructions. After mixing I placed the compound in the vacuum and removed as many bubbles as I could. Even after vacuuming, the sucker  had TONS of bubbles I couldn’t remove!

two part mold

4. Poured mixture in the frame until it covered the piece.  You can see the bubbles I couldn’t get rid of! Urgh!! I set it aside and waited 16 hours for the mold to cure at room temperature.

silicone poured in frame

5. Removed mold from the aluminum frame and cut it open with an exxacto knife. Took the pendant out and examined the mold. You can see all the bubbles that didn’t come out at the top of the mold. Here’s when I started freaking out.  By some miracle from above, none of the bubbles touched my mold! wohoo! Thank you Jesus!

mold cut open

6. Injected the mold with wax 5 times. Hubby gave me the green light to produce more than just his gift. So 4 of these babies will be up for sale soon! Woot!

wax injection

7. Then I made a wax tree out of the wax models that I was casting in silver. Notice the green anchor? That’s another custom order!

wax sprue

8. Filled the flask with investment, placed it in the steam dewaxer for 1 hour. Once the timer was done I put it in the hot kiln and  waited patiently for the 5hr burnout process to be completed.

steam dewaxer, kiln and spincaster

9. After a loooong burnout process the wax melts and the investment hardens leaving and empty cavity in the shape of the wax models. This cavity is then ready to be filled with melted silver using a centrifugal casting machine. I put the flask in the spincaster and melt the silver. Then when the silver is liquid, I let the casting machine spin and the centrifugal force shoots the melted silver in the flask filling out the cavities. So awesome.

using the spincaster

10. After submerging the scolding hot flask in water, the investment dissolves and the cast silver pieces come out with ease. They are black from oxidation and, to remove it, I put them in an environmentally safe pickling solution until they turn white. Cut out each piece with the jeweler’s saw and keep the scrap silver for future pieces. Nothing is wasted.

silver tree

11.  File, sand and polish the piece. Here I am polishing the pendant.

polishing silver

12. Clean in the piece in the ultrasonic and done! Phew!  Casi que no! Happy anniversary!

finished silver hei matau pendant1

always with love,

Adriana

Making Filigree Earrings

It’s earring making time again.

Since I am in tutorial mode, I decided to document the fabrication process so sit down, relax and enjoy the picture show.

Materials  and some tools I used:

File
Filigree wire
Easy silver solder
Flat and round nose pliers, flush cutters
Brass brush
Soldering station (torch, propane, oxygen, the works).
2 Swarovski 6mm channel set crystals

Instructions:

1. Cut 2 pieces of filigree wire to measure 3 3/8″ long with flush cutters.

20120427-224516.jpg

2. File both edges flat to remove the grooves the flush cutter left behind.

3. With a ring mandrel set the center of the wire on the size 10 mark and bend wire so that the joints touch.

4. Flux, and “easy” solder the joint. Quench in water and Pickle.

5. Re-shape it with the mandrel and flat nose pliers. Give it a nice teardrop shape.

6. Make 3 coils for each earring turning the wire as snug as possible.

7. Now make 6 round jump rings. Close 4 that will be soldered into the earring and leave the remaining 2 open.

8. Solder the parts together and pickle.

9. Using a brass brush in a mandrel, carefully clean between the wires. Clean in the ultrasonic for 2 minutes.

10. Attach the stones using the remaining 2 jump rings… and voila!